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Encountering high winds and/or waves - Emergency response for liquefied gas carriers

If the vessel encounters a dangerous situation that may develop into an emergency, it is extremely important that the whole crew know exactly what they should do to save their lives and minimize damage.



The crew must be drilled to take certain actions more or less automatically. However, nobody must act without considering the superfluous consequences. These plans should be used actively during emergency drills. Encountering High Winds and/or Waves

Against the Weather

Consider - going slow-speed against the weather. This procedure has advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantage is that rolling is increased. The advantages are:

a) Less strain in the hull

b) Less hunting of main engine

c) Reduce of damages on deck by heavy seas

d) Reduce of bottom damage by slamming


When going against the weather the minimum strain will be obtained when the speed is just enough for keeping the vessel on course about 15 20 degrees off the wind direction.

Whilst alongside, Terminal regulations must be considered.


Liquefied natural gas ship underway


With the Weather

Consider - going slow-speed against the weather. This procedure has advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantage is that rolling is increased. The advantages are:

One alternative to going against the weather is going slow ahead with the weather. Advantages are:

a) Reduced danger of bottom damages and damages on deck
b) Less strain in the engine

The disadvantages are:

a) Risk of heavy sea breaking in over the poop

b) Risk of surfing, broaching and loss of steering control

c) Risk of torsion

When going with the weather, adjust speed to avoid surfing or broaching. Oil bags may be used to prevent the seas from breaking.


Drifting

When going with the weather, adjust speed to avoid surfing or broaching. Oil bags may be used to prevent the seas from breaking. Drifting is another alternative when choosing the way of manoeuvring. The advantages are:

a) Least strain on the hull

b) No strain on the main engine

c) Less risk of heavy weather damages on deck

The disadvantages are:

a) Heavy rolling

b) Large volumes of water on deck

Consider - the metacentre height. If the vessel has a high metacentre height, the rolling will be violent with much water on deck. This may be avoided by going slowly astern in order to keep the stern up against the wind to reduce the rolling. Oil bags may be used to some advantage.


Turning

a) When going with the weather, adjust speed to avoid surfing or broaching. Oil bags may be used to prevent the seas from breaking.

b) When going with the weather it may become necessary for some reason to turn around to an opposite course against the wind. Such a turn must be carried out very carefully.

c) The manoeuvre must be started at the end of a wave train to obtain the calmest possible conditions. Reduce speed to a minimum.

d) Start the turn with the rudder hard over and increase engine power enough to have good steering control, but do not increase the speed of the vessel through the water.

e)The second part of the turn should be carried out with full engine power in order to meet the wave crest head on.

f) When the turn is complete, adjust the speed to sea conditions.


Anchor Dragging/Mooring Failure

a) Evaluate the situation. Weather condition and forecast, proximity of vessels in the vicinity, proximity from shore and grounding areas

b) Try to drop more chain

c) Try to drop second anchor

d) If considered necessary due weather conditions, ships in the vicinity dragging which may approaching dangerously, approaching to grounding areas or shore leave anchorage.




e) Remember to use main engine if you have difficulties to heave up the anchor

f) Inform CMSI, Agent and local Authorities if applicable



Related Information:


Abandonship procedures - Immediate Evacuation By Own Survival Craft

Collision accident - Emergency procedure for Liquefied Gas carriers

Salvage operation guideline

Cargo tank ruptures due to increased pressure - emergency procedure for gas carriers

Loss of power supplies - emergency actions

Risk and hazards of Equipment failure

Loss of Instrumentation during Unloading Operations - Recommended actions by Liquefied Gas carriers

Risk and hazards of Nitrogen Loss

Gas carriers Loss of Instrumentation during Loading Operations

Gas carriers Structural Damage due to Incorrect Loading/Unloading Sequence

Encountering High Winds and/or Waves - countermeasures

Safety guideline for changing previous cargo






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