Liquefied Gas Carrier

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Access to remote gas reserves & benifits of compressed gas technology

Compressed gas liquid

Project “in-service” or “first-gas” dates are important when it comes to developing a gas field. The quicker an explorer can develop his field and bring on his gas production the quicker he can start monetizing his gas. Given the modular nature of the process design and if conversion of existing vessels is envisaged the CGL Carriers in service date can be greatly reduced. With new ship yards now being made available using new-builds may result in similar expedited project timelines.



Access to remote or 'stranded' gas reserves will be greatly enhanced with the ability of these ships to serve smaller and mid-range fields. This is in the national interest of security of supply for many consuming nations.

The sole requirement for the provision of loading and offloading barges and the associated buoys connecting to conventional undersea gas pipelines, simplifies in-service needs for platform and port facilities. The loading barge that is connected to a buoy allows for the raw production gas to be loaded directly from the wellhead or the flared or associated gas from an FPSO where on it is processed and conditioned. The offloading barge and associated buoy especially offer advantages in an era of difficulties in locating receiving terminals.

The ability to 'dial-in' the required gas properties for the offloaded product means that the gas inter-changeability concerns effecting many markets viewing new supplies of LNG becomes a non issue.

In many markets, particularly the low BTU specification requirements for the US market, many constituent mixes of imported gas are restricted as they require some form of blending, or processing at a cost, to suit trouble free safe burning on existing equipment.

In Korea and Japan high BTU specification gas is the norm, and some pick-up of high BTU hydrocarbons for blending is possible on the outward voyage of the Integral gas carrier consigned to load a relatively low BTU shipment of natural gas. If a shuttle carrier configuration is employed that uses the services of an Offloading Barge at market, the ability to 'dial-in' the required gas properties for the offloaded product is maintained.

The route of such deliveries need not be fixed given the flexibility of gas loading and offloading installations. The commercial possibility of a World spot market for natural gas will without doubt emerge once these gas carriers enter service.

The improved transportation tariff offered by more effective technology, results in higher 'netbacks' to producers, which in turn translates to better royalties for producing countries or local governments. This is the bottom line to the success of this venture, and others with the same objectives.

Integral CGL carrier
Fig:Integral CGL carrier


Conversion to a CGL Carrier

The stability and longitudinal strength aspects of a ship (tanker) conversion to a CGL Carrier do not appear to present any significant problems, although differing donor vessel types will have differing ‘issues’ due to the variance in their structural configuration.

The key to the conversion of an existing single hull oil tanker to a CGL Carrier is in getting adequate cargo hold floor area for the required containment pipe capacity without stacking the pipes to an excessive centre of gravity height. Further aspects of a vessel conversion have been studied in detail, including intact stability, damaged stability, longitudinal strength, sea-keeping, and changes to the vessel’s equipment and piping. No significant issues have been identified with the above studies.




Related Information:

  1. Procedure for transporting remote gas


  2. Development and potential of todays emerging gas technologies


  3. Transporting economically viable compressed gas liquids from remote fields

  1. Procedure for transporting remote gas


  2. Development and potential of todays emerging gas technologies


  3. Transporting economically viable compressed gas liquids from remote fields





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